Thursday, March 06, 2008

Prim and proper primroses


Last weekend a friend and I went on a flower-shopping spree at Home Depot to get ready for spring. We bought bulbs, strawberry plants, daffodils, and on the way out the door saw that primroses were on sale each for $1. We went crazy and bought ten plants apiece, all different colors. They are very pretty! And they like shade, which is our whole backyard! I came home and planted much of what I had bought but only got a few of the primroses in the ground before night fell and the week swept me out of commission. This morning as I walked in to work I was thinking about where to plant the rest of my primroses when I noticed that many of my neighbors had recently planted primroses too (and pansies!). Except instead of planting every color there is all over the place (as was my plan), they had all neatly planted them in perfect rows of all the same color or alternating colors, neatly surrounded by mulch in perfect little flower beds. How prim! How proper! I briefly considered following their example but decided not to - primroses probably get sick of always being prim and proper so I think mine will really appreciate some freedom and expression.

4 comments:

Peggy said...

I am with you on this one! Nature doesn't have straight lines! THey're lovely plants. If you treat them properly, they might come back next year too! Our wild primoses should be out soon.

susan said...

I like crazy primroses too. It's so funny, the primroses that I planted come up wherever they want, while the daffys and tulips that my oldest and my dad planted come up in nice straight rows...it just cracks me up!

Uncle KT said...

I'm glad that you're offering the primroses an alternative to their usual structured existance. I can imagine their excitement

Newt said...

ha ha ha - every once in a while I consider going more structured with my yard but then I decide that chaos and random displays of beauty are more my style of gardening.
Well, that and we go by the Darwin theory. We plant it and it's up to the plant to survive :-) The strongest return after winter.